Google+ House Revivals: R is for Review

Thursday, May 20, 2010

R is for Review

Okay, class, it's always good to do a little Review.
Last week's post was about Quoins-- how many of you were able to identify the quoins in the montage?  If you couldn't, that's okay.  This week, I've included the answers!


Lintels.  These stretched across the openings of some buildings.  If the weight of the stone above was not redistributed by an arch, lintels often failed. 


Flying buttresses.  These literally buttress the wall.



Capital, with carved volutes.  One of three parts of the Classical order.



Crenelations, with spaces just big enough to shoot an arrow through.



Cornerstone.  The biggest, squarest, most perfect stone is set aside to be used as a cornerstone.  It must be perfect, because the rest of the building is built around it.



Quoins.  Large squared off stones used to build up the corners of a masonry wall.  Quoin and coin both come from a word meaning "wedge"-- because coins and quoins were tooled with special wedges.  When building a rubble wall, it's especially important to use large, strong quoins on the corners, alternating the long "legs".  This helps to tie the two walls together, and by alternating the legs, you prevent having long, continuous joint lines that can result in splitting and separating of the walls.


Keystone.  Stone structures are not held together by mortar.  They are held together by gravity.  The weight of the keystone pushing down against the rest of the arch, and thus redistributing the load, is what holds the arch together.  The keystone of an arch has a nice wedge shape, and is "wedged" into the top of the arch and held tightly in place by weight and friction.

Okay, that's my assignment for this week, Mrs Matlock!  Sorry for the "Re-tread", but I've been working on an extra credit assignment.  Here's a preview:

To see more "R" posts visit Jenny Matlock's blog.

25 comments:

  1. i liked this. i thought it was a good follow up to your last. thanks for the education. :]

    thanks, too, for reading picky and leaving it some love. that bit you read was actually the beginning of the third chapter of my novel. hopefully, i'll find the courage to finish it. next week you'll meet seth, so come back, if you'd like. :]

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  2. I certainly learned a new word today...never knew all this. I like the year on the building and again never gave much thought as to that having to be perfect in order for the rest of the building. Thanks for stopping over today.

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  3. Thanks for making me relive my art history class. It was fun. You're better than Dr Kyle. I learned more from you blog, than his class.

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  4. Thanks for posting the answers! I'll have to tell the Great Dane that I need a trip to Europe - quick! - to brush up on my architectural knowledge.

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  5. So I was mostly right! Why doesn't the cornerstone qualify as a quoin? Isn't it just a variety, like a rectangle is a quadrilateral? Do tell. And your extra credit looks amazing. Of course I've had the pleasure of seeing it before :-)

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  6. I was right! I wsa right!

    OK, sorry, my little gloat is now finished.

    What a fascinating post on this little journey through Alphabe-Thursday's Letter "R"!

    You always have such interesting information!

    That certainly wasn't a retread post at all. I learned a lot of new information!

    Thanks for helping to make Alphabe-Thursday so rich and varied!

    A+

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  7. I know nothing about houses but you certainly give very informative information

    thanks for your visit to my blog

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  8. I'm glad you revisited this because I couldn't guess hardly any LOL. Thanks. Great R post.

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  9. Thanks for stopping by my blog.
    Great photos

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  10. Love your architecture posts. I love old buildings with lots of architectural details. Next week I think my post may include one... you'll have to wait and see.

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  11. Oh, and I often read these from back to front, cuz I agree that the later posters sometimes don't get as many comments.

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  12. This was so interesting --I love learning the proper names for things and many of these architectural terms were new to me!

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  13. that was really interesting ... i had no idea that stone structures were held together by gravity ... i always find these posts so fascinating!

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  14. I love to see flying buttresses on Cathedrals in France and the UK, they make my heart soar upwards.
    Re tread or not this was a very interesting post.
    ~Maggie~

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  15. Love your Architectural Review! I've always been amazed that Keystones worked :-)

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  16. Very interesting post - thanks for sharing!

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  17. I'm glad for the review. Isn't it amazing how much beauty there is in the elements of architecture. I'm looking forward to finding out more about your extra credit.

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  18. I missed last week, but I enjoyed all the architectural information. I'm always learning things on Alphabe-Thursday (even though it's Saturday!).

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  19. Darn, I guessed wrong, and I even looked it up. Sheesh, that is why I can never cheat on a test. Thanks for the answer!

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  20. Very interesting. I especially liked the Keystone picture. Thanks.

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  21. I must confess, I have failed this test...badly! I still learnt something though...does that help my cause?

    Best wishes,
    Natasha.

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  22. Who knew? What a great, informative post. And your extra credit project looks gorgeous! Kathy

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  23. the lost symbol by Dan Brown is all about these elements of architecture......

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